The British National Anthem



The original 3 verses were first published in the October 1745 Vol. 15 edition of the Gentleman's Magazine, on p.552 at tinyurl.com/4jtz63kc (pictured above). They are the same 3 verses which exist today.


The National Anthem is unique in being a prayer to protect the person who embodies the national soul – God Save our Gracious King – unlike other national anthems which can be jingoistic appeals to abstract notions of national greatness.


Some Scottish nationalists pretend that there is a mysterious verse which is "anti-Scottish" because it states "Lord, grant that Marshal Wade…rebellious Scots to crush". Marshal Wade was the British General who was fighting the Jacobites in late 1745.


This is an urban myth promoted by people who are opposed to the monarchy in the first place. They use it as a convenient excuse for their republicanism!


Working from original documents, we have proven that the original 3 verses of this song which were published in the Gentleman's Magazine of Oct 1745 (pictured above) are still the same ones today. That is all that needs to be said to prove our point!


However, you can read our 5,500-word definitive research at our previous Legacy Site in our May 2013 essay entitled "The Alleged Rebellious Scots 'Verse' De-bunked".


TO SUMMARISE OUR FINDINGS:

1. The song was first sung on Saturday 28 September 1745 at the Drury Lane Theatre, London, one week after the Battle of Prestonpans.


2. The original 3 verses were first published in the October 1745 Vol. 15 edition of the Gentleman's Magazine, on p.552 at tinyurl.com/4jtz63kc (pictured above). They are the same 3 verses which exist today.


3. These 3 verses did not become established as "the National Anthem" until the beginning of the 1800s, long after the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion. Prior to that, it was merely a music hall song.


4. According to Buckingham Palace, there is no "authorised version", but th